Pet Cremations | CremationServices.com

Pet Cremations

He was my best friend

Our pets are our family, when we lose a pet it can affect us just as much or even more than the loss of a friend or family member. Losing a pet can be a traumatic experience for any child. Many kids love their pets very deeply and some may not even remember a time in their life when the pet wasn't around. A child may feel angry and blame themselves—or you—for the pet's death. A child may feel scared that other people or animals they love may also leave them.


pet cremations

Grief is not an easy process.

Although we all experience at some point during death or loss the clinical five stages of grief in more or less this order: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, and Acceptance, it is not a neat and orderly process. Grief is tough and it is normal to move forward and back many times. Grief has no timeline. There is no magic number of days, weeks, or months that it is correct to grieve and then move on. Do not put a time limit on your grief but do remember that it’s OK to seek help if you feel “stuck” in one stage of the grief process or if your loss is beginning to greatly affect the way you function daily. Time does heal.

Don’t feel bad for having a ‘good’ day.

You will have good days. Embrace them. Grief is physically and emotionally exhausting and painful. It’s OK to have an OK day because tomorrow you might start inexplicably crying in line at the grocery store. Both good and bad days will happen. Remember, this process is not a defined line with a beginning and end.

Let your friends know that they aren’t expected to “fix” you.
There are no just-perfect sentiments anyone can say that will make you immediately bounce back into normalcy. Your friends might try and might fail spectacularly at saying the “right thing”. Let them know what you need is someone to just listen, or a day out of the house, or an hour’s worth of distraction. They don’t need to fix you. They just need to be there. Let them know that with specific words if you’re able.

Talk to your lost pet. Out loud. Write a letter. Tell them everything you miss about them. Tell them all the decisions you are struggling with. Talk or write about your favorite memories together. This can be incredibly therapeutic.

Join a pet-loss support group either in-person or online. Even if you attend only once. It helps to be in a safe place where your loss doesn’t have to be explained.

Make a memorial to your pet.

Create a video slideshow with music using an online website. Or put together a photo album or scrapbook. Make a memory diorama with a cigar box. Put together a memorial shelf or window sill. Donate to a local shelter or rescue in their name.

Adopting again is not “replacing” your pet.
Your grief is directly proportional to the love you had for your pet — your friend, family member, and loyal companion. A friend’s wise father once told her after the death of her beloved dog, “You are not replacing her. You are finding somewhere for all the love you have in your heart to go.” Remember this. And remember our amazing friends would never want their space in your home to be empty forever. When you are ready, give that safe space to another homeless pet. Yes, losing them hurts. But we know it’s worth it.

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